What we fund

When TAI started in 2010, there was no established international accountability field. The number and capacity of organizations working for greater accountability and related goals has grown fast, many with support from TAI members. Today, our members support a broad range of organizations at global and local levels that work at the intersection of rights, participation, and accountability to advance more just, equal, inclusive, open, and green societies.

How TAI works

What does TAI funding look like?

ADVOCATES partnering with communities and other stakeholders to ensure tax and budget policies realize rights and reduce inequalities

GRASSROOTS ORGANIZERS working with indigenous groups to document the plunder of their lands and assert their rights in the courts.

INVESTIGATIVE JOURNALISTS uncovering dodgy deals that favor the politically connected.

RESEARCHERS proving the value of inclusive participatory processes in shaping government policy.

TECHNOLOGISTS guiding civil society groups to use data from multiple sources to back up their policy asks.

THINK TANKS pinpointing government revenues lost due to loopholes in international tax agreements.

ADVOCATES partnering with communities to monitor and fight for the maternal health services they were promised and deserve

GRASSROOTS ORGANIZERS working with indigenous groups to document the plunder of their lands and assert their rights in the courts.

INVESTIGATIVE JOURNALISTS uncovering dodgy deals that favor the politically connected.

RESEARCHERS proving the value of inclusive participatory processes in shaping government policy.

TECHNOLOGISTS guiding civil society groups to use data from multiple sources to back up their policy asks.

THINK TANKS pinpointing government revenues lost due to loopholes in international tax agreements.

Funding Data Library

Funding Data Library

You can explore data related to over $500 million in active transparency and accountability grants in TAI’s member funding database.

GRANTMAKERS find peers to engage around new portfolio thinking and new partners you might want to connect with.

GRANT SEEKERS find out which funders are supporting your issues, or identify new peer groups you might want to meet.

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Why it matters

TPA Full Disclosure Introducing the people behind funding and practice in the world of transparency, participation, and accountability.

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Blogs/Interviews
TPA Full Disclosure: Katharine Knox on movement-building in the TPA (transparency, participation, and accountability) sector
Katharine Knox leads the Joseph Rowntree Charitable Trust (JRCT)’s Power and Accountability Programme where she works to strengthening democratic and corporate accountability, encourage responsible media, and support work that responds to the dual harms of the Covid-19 pandemic and systemic racism. Prior to that, she spent years researching, advocating, and leading climate justice programs.
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Blogs/Interviews
TPA Full Disclosure: The Podcast! Diakhoumba Gassama on the third African Philanthropy Conference.
We are thrilled to introduce our brand new "TPA Full Disclosure: The Podcast" with Diakhoumba Gassama, Programme Officer, Gender and Inclusive Governance at The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation. Gassama reflects on key issues around the third African Philanthropy Conference: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bfO3TdYqx04
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Blogs/Interviews
TPA Full Disclosure: Accountability Initiative on building capacity towards responsive government
We spoke with Avani Kapur (Director of AI) and Avantika Shrivastava (Assistant Director Communications at AI) to explain how AI is driving evidence-based research on state capabilities and public service delivery and insights along the way
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Pathways to change

This represents critical causal pathways common to TAI donor members’ theories of change. It is in no way a representation of pathways to change for the Transparency, Participation and Accountability field as a whole.

Global InfluencesAccountability ActorsCitizensGoverment Officials12345678

What is the evidence that providing information or data produced by (inter)national bodies influences or enables accountability actors within the government to monitor government performance, sanction or reward performance, and manage expectations of citizens (and government) of their duties, responsibilities, and performance standards?

1

What is the evidence that providing information or data produced by (inter)national bodies influences or enables accountability actors outside the government to monitor government performance, sanction or reward performance, and manage expectations of citizens (and government) of their duties, responsibilities, and performance standards?

2

How do governments officials directly use information or data that is produced by (inter)national without going through any other accountability actors. (ex: ministries making data open/available and instating a FOI mechanism directly as result of the Open Government Partnership?).

3

What is the evidence that information or data is used by accountability actors inside the government (e.g. judges, parliamentarians, anti-corruption agencies, etc.) to hold government officials (includes elected, technocrats, front line service providers) accountable through sanctions or legal action?

4

What is the evidence that information or data is used by accountability actors outside the government (e.g. media, journalists, lawyers, CSOs, etc.) to hold government officials (includes elected, technocrats, front line service providers) accountable by monitoring, changing expectations of responsibilities, or scrutinizing performance?

5

What is the evidence that providing information or data influences citizens to behave as accountability actors (citizens monitoring, protesting, non-compliance), and do they act as individuals or in collectives? In particular, does citizen behavior include the use of the information itself (e.g. motivating action, clarifying operational steps, used as evidence, etc.)?

6

Do citizen accountability actions result in changes in government officials?

7

How do citizens exercise their voice as voters?

8

TAI Resources

Explore Our Resources
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Reports
Funding Trends in International Tax Justice
This scan looks back five years and speculates on the future. The focus is on funding provided by philanthropies, donor governments, and multilateral organizations. There are diverse understandings of tax justice.
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TAI Weekly
TAI Weekly|Climate Accountability Imperative
One long-running frustration in climate debates has been the failure of donors to deliver on promises and of financing to materialize on the ground.
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Blogs/Interviews
Whose Future Is It Anyway? CSOs Pioneer in Designing a Prospective Path for Africa's Most Populous Country
Is the responsibility of envisioning a nation's future solely the government's prerogative? A resounding NO, declare a coalition of Nigeria's foremost Civil Society Organizations (CSOs).
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Explore Our Resources
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